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Our Services

JRIA offers a qualified, efficient, diverse team of professionals to serve a wide variety of clients. All senior staff members hold advanced degrees in anthropology, history, or related fields, have completed Advisory Council on Historic Preservation courses on historic preservation law regulations, particularly as related to Sections 106 and 110 of the National Historic Preservation Act, and all are members of the Register of Professional Archaeologists. All field directors and supervisory staff are highly trained and hold Master’s degrees in anthropology/archaeology. In total the JRIA staff, from top to bottom, have more than 150 years experience in Virginia archaeology, focused primarily in eastern Virginia.

ARCHAEOLOGY

JRIA has considerable experience in performing the full range of archaeological and architectural fieldwork, analysis, and report preparation to assist clients in meeting local, state, and federal cultural resource management regulations.  

Our archaeological and architectural services include:

RESEARCH

JRIA has the expertise to perform archival, documentary, cartographic, photographic, and oral history research to support a wide array of projects.

Our research services include:

REGULATORY COORDINATION

JRIA is committed to assisting clients navigate the various cultural resource regulatory processes at the local, state, and federal level. 

Our regulatory coordination services include:

LABORATORY & COLLECTIONS MANAGEMENT

JRIA maintains two laboratory facilities for the processing, analysis, conservation, and storage of artifacts. The primary lab is located in Poquoson, Virginia and is approximately 3,000 square feet in size. The laboratory features a conservation facility that includes a built-in air abrading compressor, operational fume hood, and a built-in deionized water system. The climate and humidity controlled artifact storage rooms constitute nearly 1,200 square feet of space. A second laboratory facility is located in our Williamsburg office, with 250 square feet of operating wet laboratory space for initial cleaning and sorting of artifacts, and 500 square feet of archaeological/dry laboratory area for artifact analysis and temporary storage. The wet laboratory, in addition to the normal artifact-processing requirements of sinks, sediment traps, and drying racks, contains a wide variety of analytical and scientific equipment.

Laboratory and collections management services include:

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